Silent Dallas Dhu Distillery may restart production

15th September, 2015 by Amy Hopkins

Production may restart at the silent Dallas Dhu Scotch whisky distillery as the Scottish Government assesses the “feasibility” of the project.

Dallas-Dhu

Dallas Dhu Distillery has been silent for more than 20 years, but may soon restart production

First established in 1899 by entrepreneur Alexander Edward, the Speyside distillery has not produced whisky 1983 when it closed due to water shortage.

The site is currently run as a visitors’ centre and museum by Historic Scotland – an agency of the Scottish Government – where tourists explore its malt barn, kiln, mash house, tun room, still house, and bonded warehouse.

Dallas Dhu was purchased by Glasgow-based blending firm Wright & Greig shortly after it was built and was used to provide liquid for the Roderick Dhu blend.

The distillery was closed in the First World War and changed hands to new owners in 1921, however the firm went into liquidation shortly after. It was then acquired by Benmore Distillery in 1921, however was closed once again during the Great Depression and then ruined by fire a few years later.

Having undertaken “feasibility study” in 2013, Historic Scotland is now considering restarting production at the distillery after a 20-year period of silence.

“We are currently undertaking work to explore the feasibility of distilling whisky again at Dallas Dhu, building on an initial feasibility study completed in 2013,” a spokesperson for Historic Scotland said.

“Subject to the outcome of this work, we intend to develop a business case and will progress with next steps over the upcoming months.”

A number of mothballed or silent Scotch whisky distilleries have restarted production in recent months.

In November last year, Dumfriesshire-based Annandale distillery commence production with a multi-million pound investment after lying silent for almost 100 years. Earlier this year, it was also revealed the historic Bladnoch distillery would restart distillation after its acquisition by an Australian entrepreneur.

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