Wright Brothers creates gin with oyster shells

20th November, 2019 by Melita Kiely

London seafood restaurant chain Wright Brothers has come up with a solution for the thousands of oyster shells its venues go through each year – by distilling them into a gin.

Wright-Brothers-Half-Shell-Gin

Wright Brothers Half Shell Gin is distilled with oyster shells

Wright Brothers Half Shell Gin was created in partnership with The Ginstitute distillery in west London and has been designed to complement the restaurant’s oyster, shellfish and fish dishes. It will also be used in the restaurant’s cocktails.

Ivan Ruiz, Wright Brothers beverage manager, said: “We use Carlingford oyster shells, which are cold-macerated in neutral spirit and then distilled.

“We then add a percentage of the distillation to the gin. The oyster shell taste is then balanced with kelp seaweed and other ingredients, like juniper and Amalfi lemon. The result is a savoury gin with high mineral notes and a pink pepper finish.

“Half Shell Gin is the perfect pairing to a cold platter of oysters and best served in a classic gin Martini to balance the briny nature of oysters or seafood.”

Wright Brothers Half Shell Gin will be available at Wright Brothers restaurants, priced at RRP £28 (US$36) per 500ml.

Robin Hancock, co-founder of Wright Brothers, said: “Our Wright Brothers Bloody Mary, which comes garnished with an oyster, is synonymous with our restaurants.

“Our guests have always enjoyed pairing oysters with drinks, so this feels like a natural progression. We’d thought about creating our own wine, but we feel gin, especially this gin, reflects both our restaurants and the city we call home.”

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