Premiumisation pushes US spirits growth

30th June, 2016 by Kristiane Sherry

Trading up to higher quality products continues to drive spirits growth in the US market, with many categories posting double-digit growth in the super-premium segment in 2015, IWSR figures show.

Super-premium spirits continue to push US market growth

Super-premium spirits continue to push US market growth

In the 2015 calendar year saw the super-premium segment of the US industry post 33.1% volume gains, pushing its 2005-15 CAGR to 16.4% according to the IWSR’s 2016 US Beverage Alcohol Review.

Despite posting overall volume declines, the super-premium segment of the gin category posted 22% volume gains for 2015, and has grown at a CAGR of 15% since 2005.

Meanwhile Tequila performed “incredibly well”, noted IWSR, with the super-premium segment up +10.3% and the ultra-premium bracket growing 49.4% in 2015, with CAGRs of 12.8% and 29.5% respectively.

Irish whiskey too posted impressive gains, with total volume exports to the US up 19% year-on-year.

“This report confirms that Irish whiskey has taken centre stage in the US drinks market,” said Miriam Mooney, head of the Irish Whiskey Association.

“Irish whiskey exports to the US have grown by 409% over the last decade. This trend is expected to continue. Irish whiskey is the fastest growing spirits category in the world and globally Irish whiskey exports are expected to double by 2020 and double again by 2030.

“It is expected that the growth in the Irish whiskey category will also have knock-on effects on other industries, like tourism, as US Irish whiskey consumers seek to explore the heritage of their Irish whiskey products.“

When taken as a whole, the distilled spirits industry in the US posted its 19th consecutive year of volume gains, shifting 221.6m nine-litre cases for the year, representing an additional 7.4m cases, according to the report.

One Response to “Premiumisation pushes US spirits growth”

  1. kallaskander says:

    Hi there,

    premiumisation of spirits means drinking more expensive, not better.

    Premium is defined by price – not quality.

    Greetings
    kallaskander

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