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Hendrick’s offers flights on giant cucumber aircraft

In keeping with its quirky persona, Hendrick’s Gin has launched Hendrick’s Air with its flagship aircraft, The Flying Cucumber – the world’s first and only flying cucumber dirigible.

Hendrick's-Gin-Flying-Cucumber
Hendrick’s Gin has launched Hendrick’s Air, offering flights on board The Flying Cucumber dirigible

At 130 feet long and 44 feet tall, The Flying Cucumber is decorated with an enormous “eye in the sky” and travels at 35 miles per hour at approximately 1,000 feet.

“We have been continually surprised by the odd popularity of our unusual cucumber-infused gin,” said Jim Ryan, Hendrick’s national brand ambassador.

“So taking on the challenge of air travel seemed like the next logical step.”

The Flying Cucumber’s purpose is to offer an alternative to ordinary modes of transport that “have devolved into a mundane state of expeditious predictability”.

From April, Hendrick’s Air will launch coast-to-coast voyages that will run until August from Los Angeles, San Francisco, Austin, Dallas, South Florida, New Jersey, New York, Philadelphia, Boston, Ann Arbor, Indianapolis and Chicago.

All flights will depart and arrives from the same place in order to emphasise “the excitement of the flying experience itself”.

“AS we see it, flying in excess of 500 miles per hour becalmed by such conveniences as in-flight TV and noise-cancelling headphones feels no different that sitting in one’s living room,” added Ryan.

“We are offering a return to the true glamour of flight.”

Us citizens can win a flight on board The Flying Cucumber by snapping a picture of the giant air craft and uploading it to Twitter and Instagram with the ash tags #FlyingCucumber and #HendricksGin.

Those not lucky enough to be able to board a Hendrick’s Air flight can follow The Flying Cucumber’s journeys on social media using the same hashtags.

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